October Birthstones
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler

October Birthstones

Emily Sole Jewelry


We are in one of the months of the year that possesses multiple birthstones! October’s birthstones are tourmaline and opal. Let’s take a minute to talk about the interesting qualities of these gemstones, along with some of my favorite jewelry I’ve created using tourmaline + opal.


Tourmaline

Tourmaline is one of the most popular gemstones because it occurs in every color of the spectrum. The intense saturation of the tourmaline makes the gemstone more valuable.

Many tourmaline color varieties have inspired their own trade names:

  • Rubellite is a name for pink, red, purplish red, orangy red, or brownish red tourmaline, although some in the trade argue that the term shouldn’t apply to pink tourmaline.

  • Indicolite is dark violetish blue, blue, or greenish blue tourmaline.

  • Paraíba is an intense violetish blue, greenish blue, or blue tourmaline from the state of Paraíba, Brazil.

  • Chrome tourmaline is intense green. In spite of its name, it’s colored mostly by vanadium, the same element that colors many Brazilian and African emeralds.

  • Parti-colored tourmaline displays more than one color. One of the most common combinations is green and pink, but many others are possible.

  • Watermelon tourmaline is pink in the center and green around the outside. Crystals of this material are typically cut in slices to display this special arrangement.

The following are photos of tourmaline pieces I have made.

Opal

Opal is the product of seasonal rains that drenched dry ground in regions such as Australia’s semi-desert “outback.” The showers soaked deep into ancient underground rock, carrying dissolved silica (a compound of silicon and oxygen) downward.

During dry periods, much of the water evaporated, leaving solid deposits of silica in the cracks and between the layers of underground sedimentary rock. The silica deposits formed opal.

Within the opal family, there are many different varieties of opal. Each has their own unique color combinations and character traits. Although experts divide gem opals into many different categories, five of the main types are:

  • White or light opal: Translucent to semitranslucent, with play-of-color against a white or light gray background color, called bodycolor.

  • Black opal: Translucent to opaque, with play-of-color against a black or other dark background.

  • Fire opal: Transparent to translucent, with brown, yellow, orange, or red bodycolor. This material—which often doesn’t show play-of-color—is also known as “Mexican opal.”

  • Boulder opal: Translucent to opaque, with play-of-color against a light to dark background. Fragments of the surrounding rock, called matrix, become part of the finished gem.

  • Crystal or water opal: Transparent to semitransparent, with a clear background. This type shows exceptional play-of-color.

The following are photos of opal pieces I have made.

All info from Gemological Institute of America

Thank you for reading through this week’s post! If you’d like any birthstone jewelry of your own, feel to reach out using the contact tab below!

 
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
 
Emily's 3 Favorite Ring Boxes
Emily Sole Jewelry

Emily’s 3 Favorite Ring Boxes

Houston Jeweler

If you have any special family jewelry, rings that aren’t worn daily, or if you need to temporarily store your beautiful wedding ring, you can’t beat a good old fashioned ring box. I believe the box should have just as much personality as the precious cargo inside the box, so today I’m sharing some of my favorite ring boxes with you!

The Mrs Box

This has got to be one of my favorite options for a couple of reasons. The velvet texture is just so perfect for storing precious rings. The huge range of color selections they offer go perfectly with diamonds and colored stones. You can purchase whatever color you want, whether you’re choosing one that matches your wedding color palette or one in your favorite color. While The Mrs. Box used to only offer one size and shape of ring box, they now offer different sizes, shapes, and number of rings it hold (which is very nifty if you want to place your engagement ring and your band in the box). And to top it all off (literally and figuratively) they will custom foil monograms and engravings onto the tops of the ring boxes, if you so choose. So many different ways to completely customize these ring boxes and make it exactly what you want!

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Images via The Mrs Box website by Jose Villa

Images via The Mrs Box website by Jose Villa

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler

Antique Ring Boxes

If you’re more of a nostalgic, story-loving kind of person, this one is for you. Antique ring boxes are unique and have so much character. Each one is different, just like antique jewelry. I love imagining the story behind the box and the piece of jewelry that originally came in it.

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Images via Pinterest

Images via Pinterest

Classic Red Jewelry Box

These beauties are classic and elegant. It’s very timeless and sturdy, making sure that your jewelry isn’t going anywhere! Red is a meaningful color for love, so this box is perfect for engagements and anniversaries. It’s also a festive color for the holidays, perfect for those Christmastime engagements and gifts! These boxes are also available in different shapes and sizes to accommodate different types of jewelry.

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler
Image via Pinterest

Image via Pinterest

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler

So there you have it! My 3 favorite types of ring boxes. Make sure your rings are safe, secure, and looking good when they’re being photographed or stored in one of these boxes. Have a wonderful weekend!

Emily Sole - Houston Jeweler